Tag Archive | Tales of the Clockwork Pastor

Stopping A Freight Train

I’m a little wary about writing this.

freight-01The reason for my skittishness is that I don’t want my frustrations to be misunderstood.  But I think I need to try to find someway to share these frustrations; otherwise they will eat me alive.

Anyone that knows me knows that I am a bit focused on new churches.  I’ve really wanted to see new Disciples of Christ churches in Minnesota reaching various populations.  Last year, there seemed to be some passing interest with a few people, but in the end none of the people who expressed interest were that passionate to do anything.

What has also frustrated me is the lack on interest in new churches.  For reasons that allude me, Disciples clergy and lay alike don’t seem to be rushing to find ways to plant new communities.

One thing you need to know about someone like me who has autism (and maybe ADHD as well).  When we believe in something, we are all in.  There is no half steps, no casual participants.  This belief is hard to let go.  It’s like trying to stop a freight train, it just ain’t gonna happen.

If I were in a church and saw someone like that, I would have a talk with them  They would be the best workers because they believe this.  Really, really, believe this.  But I think most churches and middle judicatories don’t know how to deal with someone like me.

It was the crazy speeding train passion that led me to start a church 10 years ago.  I still had a lot to learn and I made mistakes, but I felt I was able to find a place to channel my obsession.  Community of Grace never worked out and it was closed a few years later, but it was a fun ride.

I don’t know if I want to do that again, partially because I have a church to worry about and partly because I lack the people skills needed.

But I still want to see new churches.  What is frustrating is that it seems like no one else in my denomination here in Minnesota is interested.

I know that starting new churches is not everyone’s cup of tea.  I know there are other things that mainline churches are involved in such as social justice issues.  I know that most people aren’t this obsessed about this issue.  I know that my passion/obsession has pissed people off in my denomination (and for that I’m sorry).

I wish I could just be able to push this aside.  But this desire isn’t something I can switch off, as much as I would like it to.

I don’t think I can plant another church, at least at this time.  But I do want to help others (if there are others).  I do want to spread the word on this.

This post is not supposed to be a bitchfest.  It is showing how sometimes my autism and church life collide.  It’s hard to have a desire or calling, and be told no.

I have no idea if this blog makes any sense.  Maybe I have to learn as hard as it is to do, that sometimes your passions have to be set aside.

I guess that makes sense, but it is hard to accept.

Aspergers, Self-Esteem and God

Self-Doubt in relationships autism

I will be writing a blog post on partisanship and the church, but right now I need to chat about dealing with self-esteem when you are on the autistic spectrum.

People with Aspergers especially deal with low self-esteem, partially because of being bullied and partially because we tend to isolate ourselves when we’ve been bullied.  For me, there is this sense that I’m stupid, which isn’t true, of course, but it is there because of the low self-esteem.  Sometimes experiences tend to bring people down and it is a lot harder to shake things off than it is for someone who is neurotypical.

Last year, a blogger who also has Aspergers explained why low self-esteem goes hand-in-hand with Aspergers:

The primary reason that most people with Aspergers, including myself, have self esteem issues, is due to bullying and people not being willing to make allowances for our social mistakes. Personally I have never met anyone with Aspergers who did not experience bullying in their school years and often beyond. Being socially awkward identifies us as targets in the playground. The fact that a lot of people with Aspergers are also physically clumsy doesn’t help matters at all. I always found that certain aspects of my Aspergers made me more sensitive to childhood bullies than other people. One example is the fact that I am a very literal thinker. Until a couple of years ago, I couldn’t understand that people would say spiteful and malicious things that they knew to be untrue just to hurt somebody’s feelings. I always assumed that people were just being honest and genuinely thought that I was ugly or a freak. If you are told something enough times, you internalise it and it becomes part of your self image. Many children with Aspergers are miserable in their school years-they are often isolated and excluded from playground games. If the only reaction your peers have towards you is to walk away, how are you supposed to develop a healthy self image of yourself as someone who is nice to be around? Of course, having these sorts of self esteem issues lead, in turn, to low self confidence, particularly in social situations where you feel that others will be judging you and looking for your flaws so that they can take great pleasure in pointing them out and ridiculing you for them. This compounds our social awkwardness and thus the vicious circle continues. At almost 27, I am still suffering from the effects of experiences I had before anyone even knew that my difficulties had a name, I still have days when I think the world would be a better place without me in it although, thankfully, these days are now few and far between. I always say that, until you have looked in the mirror and genuinely despised the person staring back at you, you will struggle to understand just how pervasive and destructive low self esteem can be.

It can take years for someone to get to a point where they feel good about themselves. I remember early on in ministry, a fellow pastor ripped me to shreds. It took a long time to piece back together my confidence. Once I did get it back, it happened again a number of years ago. And again, I had to rebuild myself, a process that took years. What neurotypicals can shake off takes a long time for someone on the spectrum.

Then there are what one writer calls Self-Esteem attacks.  When someone with Aspergers does something perceived as wrong there’s a sense of shame that can act like a panic attack.  Blogger Amy Murphy explains:

“Self Esteem Attacks” occur whenever a person with low self esteem does or says something that he afterwards deems to have been inappropriate, stupid, rude, obnoxious, off target, or inaccurate. At that time, the person may experience immediate remorse, excruciating anxiety, his heart racing, his face turning red, a sinking feeling of embarrassment, depression and/or devastation. Wishing he could sink into the floor or disappear, he may immediately look for a way to escape. He may feign illness, sneak out without saying anything, or just become totally silent, hoping not to be noticed. He will believe that everyone saw his blunder and is thinking poorly of him, maybe even laughing at him. This is a full blown Self-Esteem Attack that may last for minutes, hours, even days during which he berates himself, is fearful of seeing anyone who was in attendance at the time he made his “mistake,” and remain seriously depressed.

I’ve had moments where I wanted to hide and just curl up into a ball after making a mistake. On the outside, I might not show much emotion, but on the inside I start to feel like crap. I berate myself and get stuck in feedback loop of self-loathing. It’s not pretty.

The final thing to talk about is how this low self-esteem can affect relationships. I think a lot of my friendships have been stunted out of my own fear that I’m not good enough, that I can socially engage others and reminders of other past relationships. So, I remain distant,to protect myself and because I don’t have confidence that I could be a good friend or fear that I will say or do something wrong. This has happened in romantic relationships as well, but it happens more frequently in friendships. Gavin Bollard has a good blog post on how self-esteem can wreck potentially good relationships.

One thing about how my faith and self-esteem.  I truly believe what has helped me not totally fall of the deep end is my faith in God and the belief in the concept of grace- that I am loved and called by God even when I mess up and feel like I’m stupid.  It doesn’t take the self-esteem attacks away, but it does surely blunt their punch.

I was a bit leery of sharing this.  I don’t want to focus on myself or get into a pity party in front of others.  But I do want to share what someone with Aspergers deals with on daily basis.  The world can be a harsh place for those of us on the spectrum and people who don’t have autism need to understand that.

I want to end with a quote from Steph, a woman with Aspergers, about understanding how people with autism deal with self-esteem:

Next time you see someone with Aspergers or autism, please remember how they may be feeling inside and have compassion for them. We struggle daily to get by in a world which often seems to revel in making us feel like failures and sometimes just a small amount of kindness can make our day so much better.

Indeed.

Reverend Loser

Loser_by_mysticalphaEvery so often, more often than I’d like to admit, I get this feeling that I am a failure- especially when it comes to this pastor thing.

I’ve been at my church for a little over a year.  I think I’ve done a lot to help the congregation and to encourage them.  I think this church is at a different place than it was last year.  And yet, there is the feeling that I am not doing a good job, not good enough.

Part of this is dealing with some issues that took place in my life a few years ago that I am still trying to get past.  But mostly, I feel like I haven’t done enough to attract new members.

I’m probably not alone in thinking this way.  A lot of us do various things to help increase the visibility of our congregations.  We engage in social media.  We improve the church website.  We host community events.  And the result is…not many people darken our doors.

For me especially, it’s been frustrating.  I’ve been trying to establish relationships with those who left the church just before I came.  I’ve written, called and done everything short of showing up at their doorstep (and no, I am not trying that).  I may have to just give up trying to extend a hand to them.  I know that I’ve done the best I could, but I know that there is that voice somewhere that says I’m not good enough.    If I were better, I would have made contact with them and woo them back to the church.

Then there is this feeling that I’m not reaching out to the community.  If I were more outgoing, then maybe things would be better.  Maybe if I didn’t have Aspergers, I would be better able to communicate with others and then there would be more members.  I would be like that other pastor who can announce an event and 50 people show up.

All of this is nonsense to some extent.  Some of the problems facing First Christian started before I came there. Some things are the result of changes in culture.  But when few people show up to an event, or when few visitors show up to worship the questions always come flooding back.

If you want to know why so many pastors end up leaving the ministry, it’s because we tend to think that the success or failure of a church is all on us.  Pastors end up shouldering a lot of responsibility on themselves.

In the end, I have to accept some grace.  I am not all that.  All I can do is be faithful.  I try to do a good job, try to encourage the congregation, but in the end it is all on God.  It’s God that I have to trust in, but that’s hard.  I think we pastors are taught or at least we think, that we have to be demigods. I think God has to sometimes hit pastors upside the head and say to them “there is only one God baby, and you are not it.”

First-St. Paul might grow numerically and it might not. I am hoping for the former and that has been my prayer.  But in the end, it is up to God.  My job is to preach God’s hope to the people and hope they will see God at work in the world.

I just need to tell myself this over and over.

The Outrageous Autistic

As I read a number of autistic bloggers, one thing becomes very clear:  there are a lot of people with chips on their shoulders.

At some point, some autistic blogger will write a post about how someone somewhere at sometime did something that was offensive.  So they write a post basically ordering people to stop doing whatever it is they are doing that the blogger finds offensive. But they usually don’t stop there.  They then question the person’s motives, seeing them as not really caring about the autistic community.

I always find these posts tiring and whiny.  Yes, some people do things that are insensitive; but we need to be more selective in dishing our outrage.  For example, if you don’t like that someone calls you “a person with autism” instead of “autistic person.”  You don’t need to act like this person or persons set fire to your house.  Simply say to someone what you prefer. Sometimes people need a gentle correction, not the full force of political correctness.

There are things that do warrant outrage.  There is a place to be angry.  But not everything has to be treated as a capital offense.

There are times for outrage, but there is also time for educating.  Sometimes we need to give a light touch, not a punch to the gut.

The Life and Times of An Accidental Jerk

I have a love-hate relationship with the church.

jerkYes, that’s kind of an odd thing for someone whose job revolves around the church to say, but it’s true.  Church can offer me comfort and challenge me in my mission of being Christ to others. But has also been a place of pain, a place where others misunderstand me and where I am constantly wondering if I’m doing the right thing and scared how people will react when I do get it wrong.

I don’t know how it is with other folks with Aspergers, what I am sharing might just be unique to me.  But sometimes church has been a minefield, a place where I seem to do the wrong thing and not always know that until I get the angry email or conversation.

A lot of what happens in church revolves around unwritten rules.  They are things that everyone else can see, but it’s something that I can’t understand let alone see it.  Even when I think I’ve done the right things that won’t get me in trouble, somehow, I mess it up.  I missed another rule.

The result of all this is that I live in quiet fear.  I second guess my decisions, triple-check what I say, and wonder if the parishoner I’m talking to is mad at me and I don’t know it.

Church can be a minefield for pastors in general, but the church is even more of a minefield to me…and I don’t know where the mines are laid.

I don’t want to give the impression that church is all bad.  I also don’t want to live in self-pity, blaming others for my mistakes.  I also can’t expect my colleagues and the laity to have learned everything about Aspergers.  I guess I just want people to see that am trying and learning to be better. To paraphrase Jessica Rabbit, I’m not bad…I’m just wired that way.

 

Hanging Out With Dennis

carl and georgeI’ve never been the guy that people want to hang out with.  I’ve never been the person that people really want to confide in.  For the most part, I’ve been the guy on the outside of the group.

None of this means that I have no friends.  It does mean that there is a certain platonic intimacy that I haven’t fully experienced.  It does mean learning to be alone.

 

I’m beginning to understand that the reason it has been such a struggle to make friends is because I’m autistic; meaning, I have difficulty communicating to others.  I’ve started to liken this to entering a room where everyone is speaking German and I’m speaking Swahili.

Autistic blogger C.W. Wyatt notes that he is not the one that people want to hang out with:

Hanging out with friends seems to be something that most of my Facebook “friends” do on a weekly basis. Some seem to be hanging out nightly. They are the social butterflies I sometimes envy, because social skills matter personally and professionally.

I don’t get random emails, messages, or phone calls from people asking, “What are you doing tonight?” I can’t recall the last personal, non-work message, that was not initiated by me. People don’t reach out to me without a reason.

The other thing that makes communication difficult is that I’m constantly overthinking every damn thing I do.  I obess over saying the right thing to someone.  I get nervous that a sign of friendly affection might be taken the wrong way.  I tend to think that I do things that are taken the wrong way.  This has implications not just in social situtations, but also at work.  I’ve ended up on the wrong side of a supervisor for doing something that got me into trouble.

I’m learning that I will always be on the outside.  Please understand, this isn’t a pity party; I’m just understanding that no matter how I try to improve my social relationships, there will always be problems.

Fool Me Once…

l_4d1a8c20-9d46-11e1-bda1-cb0a57400002Last week, I had a conversation over the phone with a fellow pastor who is interested in planting a church.  He share some of his plans and ideas.  It seemed solid, so I asked him to share an outline of his idea that I could pass on to some other folks in the area.

While I’m excited to hear about his plans, there is a part of me that is wary, a fear that he’s just talking and not really that into planting a church.

Last year, when I was still leading New Church Ministry Team in the region, I had a number of people call me and tell me that they wanted to plant a church.  Each time I was excited and hopeful.  It seemed like God was doing a new thing in the area.  But everytime nothing came of it.  Most of the time I’d never hear back.  I had one person who said they had plans to start a church in the East Metro and was given items to start the church.  This person even went as far as printing business cards.  And then, nothing.  He got cold feet or realized he wasn’t that interested after all and abandoned plans to go farther.

All of these aborted plans do have an effect.  As I sit here a year later, I feel heartbroken.  Since I am so literal, when these people said they wanted to plant a church, I believed them.  Maybe there was an interest, but seeing so many people not take their idea to the next level kind of hurt me in a way.  I’m not saying this to blame folk, just to share it had an effect.

So a year later, someone says they want to plant a church and I have a hard time believing them.  Being the Aspie pastor that I am, the things I am passionate about are things I am REALLY passionate about.  I am passionate about new churches.  I want to see new Disciples of Christ churches in Minnesota.  So, when I hear someone casually say they want to plant a church, my heart goes all in.  This makes the letdown that much harder.

I sometimes feel that I’m alone in this passion.  Everybody else seems concerned about other things, but no one else seems to want to plant new churches.

Part of the reason for my passion comes from my evangelical upbringing.  While I don’t always agree theologically with evangelicals these days, I still admire their passion for sharing the gospel.  I don’t see that happening as much in the more liberal waters these days.  There are people like Nadia Bolz-Weber and a good chunk of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America that do want to tell the good news.  Bolz-Weber has a liberal evangelism that I love.  I wish there were more people like her, wanting to tell people about the love of Jesus.

A while back I shared my frustrations with a fellow pastor.  He suggested going and planting a church.  I have to say that is tempting, but I’m already busy trying to revitalize a congregation so I don’t know if I can.

All I can do right now is pray to God that this time, someone is truly serious in starting something new.

I hesitate share all of this, because I don’t want this to be “Dennis having a pity party.”  But I also need to be honest about how I’m feeling.  And right now that’s a bit of heartache.

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