About

Welcome to my blog, The Clockwork Pastor.  For five years, I did my religious blogging over at Oscar the Pastor.  Then in 2008, I was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome, a form of autism and started blogging about autism as well.  After a while, it seemed that Oscar had outlived its usefulness, so I decided to start a new blog that incorporated talking about faith, talking about being gay and African American and about being on the spectrum.

And the result is this new blog.

Quick things about me, I’m in my 40s, grew up in Flint, Michigan.  From 2008 until 2013 I was the Associate Pastor at First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Minneapolis.  I’m currently the Stated Supply Pastor at First Christian Church in Mahtomedi, MN. I live in Minneapolis with my wonderful partner, Daniel and serve two cats, Carlos and Felix.

So why Clockwork Pastor? In some way, I’ve identified with androids and robots.  I’m constantly having to learn how the rest of the world operates and it can leave me at times confused about things.  And like Questor, as well as Gene Roddenberry’s other android, Data I do a lot of observation on what is going on.  In many ways, I’m still trying to figure out how humans operate and how to make my way in the world.

Which makes being an Associate Pastor really fascinating.

So, sit back and enjoy!

7 thoughts on “About

  1. Dennis, I see you read the Bible correctly. Good luck with all the pin heads that are sure to go after you. I am on your side.

  2. Just read your article about the Flint Water problem. I am recently retired from 23 years of serving the water utilities in Florida and have been wondering how what is reportedly happening in Flint is possible. Most of the media is blaming the governor and missing all the facts. Your article was, by far the most informative. The problem is far below the governor; every water plant is run by a licensed water operator whose job it is to monitor the operation of the plant on a daily basis. pH is perhaps the most important and continuously monitored parameter and a corrosive or low pH is a very common and easily corrected problem. Where were the operators who were monitoring this plant? Why did they not demand that the pH be raised? A licensed operator is obligated to make these decisions to preserve the quality of the water and the safety of the community. In most states the water operators are controlled by the State Dept of Environmental Protection and reports are sent daily or weekly to the DEP reporting a number of parameters, but always pH. There is no excuse for this to have gone on for as long as it did. If the operator was negligent, then the DEP should have seen the low pH recorded on the reports sent to them and demanded action. In Florida the reports are called MOR’s. I commend you for your story and hope that you will expose the real culprits. In addition to the many people that are ill from the high lead and other metals, there will also be a lot of damage to plumbing in all the homes that this super corrosive water entered costing the homeowners many hundreds of thousands of dollars to repair. Encourage you not to stop here; find a qualified water operator from another town who can explain the Michigan system to you and help you get to the bottom of the problem. Thanks for a good job–not many folks in the “media” are doing the kind of job that you are doing. Not just looking for someone to blame, but searching for the facts.

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